synchronicity: in hope, anger, books, twitter

wow. this is the kind of shit that makes me glad to ask questions.
and therefore, ask more questions.

i feel like i’ve acessed a treasure trove of links. data and stories. data and stories.
dude, there’s no judgement, i have profound combo of feelings: amazement, delight, respect.

in part synchronicity, in part magic. i say synchronicity for a few reasons:
1. the Marshall Ganz article in Sojourners magazine is brilliant, laden with deep learnings. thus, will require slow digestion, and repetition in reading it.
in fact, i was just requesting Marshall Ganz’ newest book, Why David Sometimes Wins, off of paperbackswap.com earlier today. i’ve had 3 books requested from me in the last 24 hours. and someday, hopefully i will get those credits translating into Ganz‘ recent book, When David Sometimes Win, or the books by bad-ass farmer in southern Virginia, Joel Salatin.

2. also, i was just thinking of needin to locate that Malcolm Gladwell article. though it sounds like there are severe misgivings in the points he argues, it serves a tremendous purpose. as a writer, he puts his thoughts down on paper and into magazines that reach an audience of millions. inevitably, such an article — as a moment in time — offers a hook, or door ajar, to discuss concepts of society, technology, what moves and motivates people, and justice. and forces us to have to consider the story that we tell, the point that we are trying to make. by incorporating the new data that he puts forth. or determining that there is no merit in giving verbiage by responding to a Gladwellesque social thinker/critic.

3. and then, synchronicity. cuz in getting to glance at your links on pyramids of engagement, and that alchemyofchange response. which now that i’ve read it, is saying something similar to what i’ve said. in fewer paragraphs. and using  less pretty words.

Tracing slavery

Baltimore, Philly and Greensboro just aint the same after reading Octavia Butler’s science fiction on time traveling into slavery. Kindred — first published in 1997. First picked up by me in mid-August 2010.

I’ve trampled over history this summer of 2010. Looked at leaves swaying along the interstate south of Philadelphia. Seen Black youth, Black families and Black communities with new eyes. New eyes cast having read about the slave trade, migration routes, escape routes, and movement of commerce.

I sat in a branch of the Durham Public Library, pulling books edited by Ishmael Reed and Member of the Club, a collection of articles written by Lawrence Otis Graham. Slavery doesn’t look the same now that it sits on the other side of the wall. A wall capable of taking my arm off, as it did to Dana/Edana in Kindred.

Atrocities of commerce. Or was it genocide borne of commerce, in visiting Colorado’s Camp Amache and Sand Creek Massacre. According to the War Department, Amache was called the Granada War Relocation Center.

All this, for a mulatto in miscegenation nation.

Books with stillness and connectedness

Jeez, books are magic.
On the train, I’ve just opened to a page in Tao Te Ching (translated by Stephen Mitchell) that reads:
“the feeling of deep connectedness, of knowing exactly what to do, beyond any conscious intention. You submerge yourself beneath the words, in a very still place, and you listen intently.”
Mitchell is describing the trance he was in in crafting the pages that preceded the epilogue.

Maybe such deep connectedness was this morning between 8:15 and 9:25. It was so on the beachhead, too. And on the porch last night. in the park stargazing with Aaron and raspy friends.

Doors upon doors and doors. Abyss. Isolation and unity/ in paradox/ together.

Books at the decade’s dawn

Of all the books on my nightstand, there’s currently plenty o nonfiction:

Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison
I Will Teach You to be Rich, by Ranji Sethi
Post Traumatic Slave Disorder, by Joy DeGruy Leary
Soul of Money, by Lynne Twist
The Summer of Black Widows, by Sherman Alexie

Ambitious to read books simultaneously, but it works better for me. It’s kinda like when I have an abundance of groceries in my kitchen rather than not enough. When I haven’t been to the grocery store, I end up glossing over the hunger I do have. And I hastily buy food out, which is rarely as tasty and satisfying nevermind nutritious and filling as what can be prepped or cooked at home. Similarly, too many books keeps my mind/soul in a literary state. I read more pages per week, or month, than when I stick to reading a single book that can stumble along, bore and lead me to putting that book down for days. And I avoid other books because I inhibit myself from picking up a different genre or author.

Here’s to reading more and more. Both online, on my mobile tech, and on the written and typed page. Back to Joy DeGruy to help me rest my eyes…