Hope and Fear

Dying people don’t lose hope; it just changes. First, you hope for a mistake…. Next, you hope for a cure. A new treatment. A miracle! Hope is a lot like fear; both are based on what might happen. Hoping for a cure and fearing that there isn’t one are versions of the same thought: I’m not going to die.

Sallie Tisdale in Advice for Future Corpses. Page 82

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From: letter to white teachers of my Black children

You need cultural knowledge and skills.

Dominant culture in US suppresses conversations around race … for numerous reasons, most of them related to the maintenance of the power status quo.

Proximity does not equal awareness… And colorblindness is not a thing. While it’s right to treat children equitably, it’s also important to understand how race shapes lives in a racist system.

We all breathe in the smog of oppression, and the only way to expel it is to read, listen, reflect, ask questions and become better as a result of what we learn. I’m here asking you as educators to help lead the way. By improving equity in schools, by becoming truly inclusive learning communities with an effective anti-racist curriculum, we improve both individual lives and equity and justice in society. I’m here for you and I’m rooting for you. As Lilla Watson said, “… your liberation is bound up with mine.”

All the while listening to Curtis Mayfield, the get cut off. These and more concepts at: https://teachingwhilewhite.org/blog/2019/6/21/a-letter-to-white-teachers-of-my-black-children

Delta Land Stolen Taken Lost

Vann Newkirk II in the Great Land Robbery, September 2019 issue of The Atlantic:

A war waged by deed of title has dispossessed 98 percent of black agricultural landowners in America. They have lost 12 million acres over the past century. But even that statement falsely consigns the losses to long-ago history. In fact, the losses mostly occurred within living memory, from the 1950s onward.

No longer left or right

But politics of life or politics of death, according to Gustavo Petro, Senator in Colombia and presidential candidate in 2018:

I think that was a relatively logical way and a relatively realistic way to describe politics in the 20th century, but today politics is divided between the politics of life and the politics of death. Climate change worldwide separates us into two major sides. 

Death gets the bigger budgets: war, starvation, homelessness, illness, incarceration.

***

And investment in military spending begets occupation leads to resentment and radicalization, evident by the Pentagon’s own researchers who noted that the number of groups, the number of incidents and the number of countries consumed by violence have risen since the formation of the African Command Center in 2002.

Two Wolves

Two wolves were in the house and they kept trying to pick me up. Running around and I was getting away from them. They were brown in color with round shaped heads. I did not feel safe. How did they get in? How did they get out? I think they were two wolf spirits.

Globalization’s Four Progeny

Writing on England in the mess of Brexit, Alexander Cockburn writes on counterpunch that:

globalisation has produced political crises all over the world which differ in some respects but have certain common themes such as de-industrialisation, increased inequality, immigration, and the alienation of large parts of the population

These four define the political, economic and social tumult filing many countries and most nations. I studied Geography from Form 3 through 5 and the push and pull factors that we used to categorize migration provide scaffolding for the waves of people moving across land, continents, and bodies of water. These four elements compose a self-perpetuating cycle where inequality begets alienation that causes immigration resulting in more de-industrialization, which completes the loop by resulting in more inequality.

On moral economy (aka philanthrocapitalism)

From Gates to Adam Smith and the Rogan triumvirate of R.H. Tawney, Karl Polanyi, and E.P. Thompson. The two closing paragraphs of Tehila Sasson’s review of The Moral Economists by Tim Rogan are:

In this sense, it is worth recalling one of Polanyi S most important conclusions, written out of Rogan’s narrative: moral economies never emerge out of spontaneous human fellowship. Rather, moral economies are shaped by the state. It took immigration laws, regulations, and taxation to determine the relationships between ethics and the economy in the late 1970s, as they do today.
Despite its radical origins, in other words, the moral critique of the economy never transcended the realm of ethics. Every political economy has an ethics, but to truly reshape the ethics of the market we will need to reform it through state institutions. That requires us to leave the realm of the spiritual and go back to material question of redistribution.

Further, Gates trying to contest Thomas Piketty’s analysis of global inequality is pitiful. And almost comical.